Bread, Love and Dreams

Bread, Love and Dreams

Year

1953

Genre

Comedy

Category

Cinema


Synopsis

The film that reinvented the comedy and enchanted millions of viewers of yesteryear and today

A masterpiece of communicative immediacy, an anthem to the pleasure of cinema

One of Vittorio De Sica’s most unforgettable characters and the role of a lifetime for Gina Lollobrigida

A film adored by audiences of yesteryear and today, Pane, amore e fantasia reinvented the comedy, with complete disregard for certain ideological critics who when faced by joy and frivolity shield their eyes and consider “romantic neorealism” a mortal offense. Comencini summarised his  perfectly realised intentions by stating: “I wanted to make an elegant character-based comedy in a rural environment, free from vulgarity and inside a specific social setting.” The real world and theatre are fused together with supreme naturalness. It is an anthem to the pleasure of making (and watching) a cinema full of living characters and irresistible actors that is well-paced from start to finish. A masterpiece of communicative immediacy. Gina Lollobrigida has never been so brilliant or so beautiful as in the role of “Bersagliera”. Along with the seemingly innocent and incredibly funny De Sica, she transports the audience into a wonderful, fresh and light-hearted comedy that left an indelible mark.

Marshal Carotenuto is assigned to a village in the mountains of Central Italy, where the favourite pastime of the inhabitants is poking their noses into other people’s business. He has romantic intentions for a bubbly local girl known as “Bersagliera”, who is understandably difficult not to notice. Unfortunately, she is secretly in love with police officer Stelluti. Carotenuto then falls for a midwife, who reveals herself to be the mother of a secret son. In the end, the parish priest will intervene to remove any obstacle that hinders the union of the happy couple.

The film that reinvented the comedy and enchanted millions of viewers of yesteryear and today

A masterpiece of communicative immediacy, an anthem to the pleasure of cinema

One of Vittorio De Sica’s most unforgettable characters and the role of a lifetime for Gina Lollobrigida

A film adored by audiences of yesteryear and today, Pane, amore e fantasia reinvented the comedy, with complete disregard for certain ideological critics who when faced by joy and frivolity shield their eyes and consider “romantic neorealism” a mortal offense. Comencini summarised his  perfectly realised intentions by stating: “I wanted to make an elegant character-based comedy in a rural environment, free from vulgarity and inside a specific social setting.” The real world and theatre are fused together with supreme naturalness. It is an anthem to the pleasure of making (and watching) a cinema full of living characters and irresistible actors that is well-paced from start to finish. A masterpiece of communicative immediacy. Gina Lollobrigida has never been so brilliant or so beautiful as in the role of “Bersagliera”. Along with the seemingly innocent and incredibly funny De Sica, she transports the audience into a wonderful, fresh and light-hearted comedy that left an indelible mark.

Marshal Carotenuto is assigned to a village in the mountains of Central Italy, where the favourite pastime of the inhabitants is poking their noses into other people’s business. He has romantic intentions for a bubbly local girl known as “Bersagliera”, who is understandably difficult not to notice. Unfortunately, she is secretly in love with police officer Stelluti. Carotenuto then falls for a midwife, who reveals herself to be the mother of a secret son. In the end, the parish priest will intervene to remove any obstacle that hinders the union of the happy couple.


Bread, Love and Dreams